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Colloquium Series

Note: Unless otherwise noted, all presentations begin promptly at 3:00pm in the Sociology Commons (SSCI 1061).  For more information contact Jack Thomas or Eli Wilson.

"Precarious Opportunities: Careers Trajectories of State and NGO Healthcare Workers in Malawi" by Dr. Amy Zhou

Date: 
Mar 08, 2019 - 03:00pm
Location: 
Sociology Commons (SSCI 1061)
Please join us for a talk by Amy Zhou, entitled "Precarious Opportunities: Careers Trajectories of State and NGO Healthcare Workers in Malawi." Amy Zhou is a medical sociologist who focuses on race/ethnicity, global and transnational sociology, inequality, and ethnographic analysis.

"The Ambivalent State" by Javier Auyero

Date: 
Feb 08, 2019 - 02:00pm
Location: 
Sociology Commons (SSCI 1061)

Please join us for a colloquium talk by Dr. Javier Auyero, entitled "The Ambivalent State." Dr. Auyero is a professor of sociology at the University of Texas - Austin. This invited talk is being supported by the department's Korzenwiecz Endowment, which was established to bring in experts on Latin America and/or comparative sociology to visit the sociology department.

The talk will be held on February 8th at 2:00pm in the Sociology Commons.

Girls’ Agency in the Context of Neighborhood Gender Stratification

Date: 
Apr 27, 2018 - 03:00pm
Location: 
Sociology Commons (SSCI 1061)
For our last colloquium of the Spring 2018 semester, Drs. Aubrey Jackson and Brian Soller will present on his recent research. The talk is titled, "Girls’ Agency in the Context of Neighborhood Gender Stratification".

Correlates of Violent Political Extremism in the United States

Date: 
Apr 04, 2018 - 12:00pm
Location: 
Sociology Commons (SSCI 1061)

Gary LaFree is Director of the National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism (START) and the Chair Elect of the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of Maryland. His research is on the causes and consequences of violent crime and terrorism. His most recent books are Putting Terrorism in Context (with Laura Dugan and Erin Miller) and Countering Terrorism (with Martha Crenshaw).

ABSTRACT

While research on terrorism has grown rapidly in recent years, few studies have applied criminological theories to the analysis of individual-level political extremism. Instead, research on radicalization has drawn primarily from political science and psychology and has overwhelmingly focused on violent extremists, leaving little variation in the dependent variable. Using a newly available dataset, we test whether a set of variables derived from prominent criminological theories are helpful in distinguishing between non-violent and violent extremists. Results show that variables related to social control (lack of stable employment), social learning (radical peers), psychological perspectives (history of mental illness), and prior criminal record all have significant effects on participation in violent political extremism and are robust across multiple techniques for imputing missing data. At the same time, other common indicators of social control (e.g., education, marital status) and social learning perspectives (e.g., radical family members) were not significant in the multivariate models. We argue that terrorism research would benefit from including criminology insights and by considering political radicalization as a dynamic, evolving process, much as life-course criminology treats more common forms of crime.

Preventing Burnout in Graduate School

Date: 
Mar 23, 2018 - 03:00pm
Location: 
Sociology Commons (SSCI 1061)
Graduate school is a stressful endeavor that leaves students vulnerable to mental health struggles.  Join us for a candid discussion on graduate student burnout. More details to follow.

The Mental Health Consequences of Family Separation for Refugees

Date: 
Mar 09, 2018 - 03:00pm
Location: 
Sociology Commons (SSCI 1061)
On March 9th, Dr. Jessica Goodkind will present her research in a talk entitled, "The Mental Health Consequences of Family Separation for Refugees: Mixed Methods Findings and Implications for Sociology, Policy, and Practice".

Navigating the Non-Sociology, Non-Academic Job Market

Date: 
Feb 23, 2018 - 03:00pm
Location: 
Sociology Commons (SSCI 1061)
Join us for a panel discussion for graduate students on non-sociology, non-academic jobs.  Guest panelist include: Danielle Albright (Department of Emergency Medicine, UNM), Kristine Denman (Director of the New Mexico Statistical Analysis Center), and Matt Hughes (Senior VP, Research & Polling, Inc.).

Tactical Potency and Contested Meaning in the NFL Protests

Date: 
Jan 26, 2018 - 03:00pm
Location: 
Sociology Commons (SSCI 1061)

Join us for the first colloquium talk of the Spring 2018 semester.  Dr. Sharon Erickson Nepstad and graduate student, Alex MacLennan will present a talk, entitled, "Tactical Potency and Contested Meaning in the NFL Protests".  For more information, click here.

ABSTRACT: This talk addresses two key questions: 1) What factors make a tactic potent, sparking a strong reaction, while other tactics fall flat? and 2) How do protesters and their opponents contest and reframe the meaning of symbolic tactics to either thwart or sustain the pace of insurgency?  To address these questions, we examine the recent use of symbolic tactics in sports to protest political violence against African-Americans.  We conduct a comparative analysis of three cases to assess tactical potency: the 2012 NBA “Hoodies Up” protest, the 2014 St. Louis Rams NFL “Hand Up, Don’t Shoot” protest, and the 2016-2017 NFL “Take A Knee” protest.  We argue that four factors were particularly important: the capacity to reinterpret the tactic’s meaning; the setting for the action; the broader political context; and the engagement of high visibility opponents. Additionally, we use the method of process tracing to discern the various ways that NFL kneeling protesters and their opponents tried to shift the tactic's symbolic meaning.  We identify and illustrate several maneuvers that were used to thwart or revive the kneeling tactic. We argue that the NFL protests challenge traditional models of tactical interaction.  By contesting old meanings and attributing new symbolism, a movement can sustain insurgency without tactical innovation or the intervention of powerful third parties.  

Regional Nationalism: The Case of the Hispano Nation

Date: 
Dec 08, 2017 - 03:00pm
Location: 
Sociology Commons (SSCI 1061)
Felipe Gonzales will present his latest research in a presentation entitled, "Regional Nationalism:  The Case of the Hispano Nation".

Diabetes in American Indian/Alaska Native Communities: A Content Analysis of Academic Research

Date: 
Oct 27, 2017 - 03:00pm
Location: 
Sociology Commons (SSCI 1061)
Kimberly Huyser will present her research on health and American Indian populations.  Her presentation is entitled, "Diabetes in American Indian/Alaska Native Communities: A Content Analysis of Academic Research".

Hidden Windows of Discretion and Disparity

Date: 
Sep 08, 2017 - 03:00pm
Location: 
Sociology Commons (SSCI 1061)
As part of our Fall Colloquium Series, Noah Painter-Davis will present his paper entitled, "Hidden Windows of Discretion and Disparity: Downward Departures, Intermediate Punishments, and Racial Disparities in Drug Sentencing In Pennsylvania".

Publishing in Academic Journals: A Discussion with the Editors of Sociology of Race and Ethnicity

Date: 
Aug 25, 2017 - 03:00pm
Location: 
Sociology Commons (SSCI 1061)

Join us for a discussion of journal publishing, with Dr. David L. Brunsma and David G. Embrick, co-editors of Sociology of Race and Ethnicity.