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Colloquium Series

Note: All presentations begin promptly at 3:00pm in the Sociology Commons (SSCI 1061).  For more information contact Elizabeth Korver-Glenn or Owen Whooley.

Girls’ Agency in the Context of Neighborhood Gender Stratification

Date: 
Apr 27, 2018 - 03:00pm
Location: 
Sociology Commons (SSCI 1061)
For our last colloquium of the Spring 2018 semester, Drs. Aubrey Jackson and Brian Soller will present on his recent research. The talk is titled, "Girls’ Agency in the Context of Neighborhood Gender Stratification".

Preventing Burnout in Graduate School

Date: 
Mar 23, 2018 - 03:00pm
Location: 
Sociology Commons (SSCI 1061)
Graduate school is a stressful endeavor that leaves students vulnerable to mental health struggles.  Join us for a candid discussion on graduate student burnout. More details to follow.

The Mental Health Consequences of Family Separation for Refugees

Date: 
Mar 09, 2018 - 03:00pm
Location: 
Sociology Commons (SSCI 1061)
On March 9th, Dr. Jessica Goodkind will present her research in a talk entitled, "The Mental Health Consequences of Family Separation for Refugees: Mixed Methods Findings and Implications for Sociology, Policy, and Practice".

Navigating the Non-Sociology, Non-Academic Job Market

Date: 
Feb 23, 2018 - 03:00pm
Location: 
Sociology Commons (SSCI 1061)
Join us for a panel discussion for graduate students on non-sociology, non-academic jobs.  Guest panelist include: Danielle Albright (Department of Emergency Medicine, UNM), Kristine Denman (Director of the New Mexico Statistical Analysis Center), and Matt Hughes (Senior VP, Research & Polling, Inc.).

Tactical Potency and Contested Meaning in the NFL Protests

Date: 
Jan 26, 2018 - 03:00pm
Location: 
Sociology Commons (SSCI 1061)

Join us for the first colloquium talk of the Spring 2018 semester.  Dr. Sharon Erickson Nepstad and graduate student, Alex MacLennan will present a talk, entitled, "Tactical Potency and Contested Meaning in the NFL Protests".  For more information, click here.

ABSTRACT: This talk addresses two key questions: 1) What factors make a tactic potent, sparking a strong reaction, while other tactics fall flat? and 2) How do protesters and their opponents contest and reframe the meaning of symbolic tactics to either thwart or sustain the pace of insurgency?  To address these questions, we examine the recent use of symbolic tactics in sports to protest political violence against African-Americans.  We conduct a comparative analysis of three cases to assess tactical potency: the 2012 NBA “Hoodies Up” protest, the 2014 St. Louis Rams NFL “Hand Up, Don’t Shoot” protest, and the 2016-2017 NFL “Take A Knee” protest.  We argue that four factors were particularly important: the capacity to reinterpret the tactic’s meaning; the setting for the action; the broader political context; and the engagement of high visibility opponents. Additionally, we use the method of process tracing to discern the various ways that NFL kneeling protesters and their opponents tried to shift the tactic's symbolic meaning.  We identify and illustrate several maneuvers that were used to thwart or revive the kneeling tactic. We argue that the NFL protests challenge traditional models of tactical interaction.  By contesting old meanings and attributing new symbolism, a movement can sustain insurgency without tactical innovation or the intervention of powerful third parties.  

Regional Nationalism: The Case of the Hispano Nation

Date: 
Dec 08, 2017 - 03:00pm
Location: 
Sociology Commons (SSCI 1061)
Felipe Gonzales will present his latest research in a presentation entitled, "Regional Nationalism:  The Case of the Hispano Nation".

Diabetes in American Indian/Alaska Native Communities: A Content Analysis of Academic Research

Date: 
Oct 27, 2017 - 03:00pm
Location: 
Sociology Commons (SSCI 1061)
Kimberly Huyser will present her research on health and American Indian populations.  Her presentation is entitled, "Diabetes in American Indian/Alaska Native Communities: A Content Analysis of Academic Research".

Hidden Windows of Discretion and Disparity

Date: 
Sep 08, 2017 - 03:00pm
Location: 
Sociology Commons (SSCI 1061)
As part of our Fall Colloquium Series, Noah Painter-Davis will present his paper entitled, "Hidden Windows of Discretion and Disparity: Downward Departures, Intermediate Punishments, and Racial Disparities in Drug Sentencing In Pennsylvania".

Publishing in Academic Journals: A Discussion with the Editors of Sociology of Race and Ethnicity

Date: 
Aug 25, 2017 - 03:00pm
Location: 
Sociology Commons (SSCI 1061)

Join us for a discussion of journal publishing, with Dr. David L. Brunsma and David G. Embrick, co-editors of Sociology of Race and Ethnicity.

Upcoming Colloquia

Preventing Burnout in Graduate School

Mar 23, 2018 - 03:00pm
Sociology Commons (SSCI 1061)

read more

The Mental Health Consequences of Family Separation for Refugees

Mar 09, 2018 - 03:00pm
Sociology Commons (SSCI 1061)

read more