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MA/PhD Requirements

MA/PhD REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS
(Revised August, 2016) 

The Sociology Department is required to conform to the general guidelines of Graduate Studies, which are presented in the UNM Catalog. Students should become familiar with the UNM Catalog http://catalog.unm.edu/catalogs/2016-2017/. Students may continue to follow the requirements of the Catalog under which they entered, even if later editions vary, though they are free to choose to switch to the requirements of a later edition of the Catalog.

The Sociology Department offers a Ph.D. degree with an MA degree earned en route. We do not offer a separate MA terminal degree. All of our graduate students are admitted directly into the PhD program. Those who enter without an MA degree and thesis complete the required MA en route to the Ph.D. Although students may leave the program after finishing their MA, students enter our program with the initial intent of earning the Ph.D.


Table of Contents

You may click on and go directly to a particular subsection or scroll down through the complete document.

I.       ADVISORS
II.      M.A. REQUIREMENTS
III.     CONTINUATION IN THE PH.D. PROGRAM POST-MA
IV.    Ph.D. REQUIREMENTS
V.     TEACHING PREPARATION
VI.    STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE AND EVALUATION
VII.   DEPARTMENTAL FUNDING GUIDELINES
VIII.  COURSE TRANSFER POLICY
IX.    FACULTY EXPERTISE AND CORE COURSES IN COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION AREAS

Download MA/PhD Requirements PDF


I. ADVISORS 

The Faculty Graduate Director (chair of the Graduate Committee) advises all graduate students in their first semester. One semester after admission to the graduate program students are responsible for choosing their own faculty advisor. At this time the Appointment of Graduate Advisor form, which requires the signatures of the student and faculty member, must be filed with the department’s Graduate Coordinator.

The advisor should help the student plan and move through his/her graduate program, including advising the student on research courses that may help prepare and complete a thesis or dissertation.  Students are free to change advisors, though doing so requires the completion of a new Appointment of Graduate Advisor form.

II. M.A. REQUIREMENTS

Students admitted to the Ph.D. program without an approved MA (including thesis) will be considered a Pre-M.A. Ph.D. student and must still complete all M.A. requirements listed below.

Students admitted to the Ph.D. program from outside the UNM Department of Sociology must complete all MA requirements, including the thesis, unless the Graduate Committee formally approves the MA thesis. Upon the request of the student, the Graduate Committee may accept a previous M.A. thesis if the thesis is in a closely-related social science discipline and meets departmental standards for original sociological research. A student with an approved MA (including thesis) will be considered a Post –M.A. PhD. student.  

All students will be required to meet the program requirements for Plan I in the University Catalog. The Sociology Department does not offer a Plan II (exam) track. Our M.A. requires 24 hours of coursework, 6 hours of thesis, and a written thesis. Prior to writing a thesis, students must form a Thesis Committee (TC) consisting of a chairperson and at least two other faculty members (one of these may serve as co-chair). Students are responsible for notifying the Graduate Coordinator and their TC the semester prior to their planned graduation.

Only students appearing on the University’s copy of the departmental graduation list are eligible for graduation each semester.[1] Once each spring, summer, and fall the Graduate Coordinator sends out a call for ‘intention to graduate’ in the following semester (e.g. each summer students are asked if they plan to graduate in the fall) and compiles a departmental list that is then submitted to the Graduate Studies office. Eligibility for inclusion on the graduation list consists of a completed and approved Program of Studies form and the reasonable demonstration that the thesis and any outstanding coursework will be completed by the end of the coming semester.

A. COURSE WORK 

Required courses[2]:

  • Sociology 523: THEORY PROSEMINAR (should be taken first semester)
  • Sociology 500: Classical Social Theory OR Sociology 513: Contemporary Theory 1 OR Sociology 514: Contemporary Theory 2 
  • Sociology 580: METHODS OF SOCIAL RESEARCH 
  • Sociology 581: ADVANCED SOCIAL STATISTICS I 
  • 14 hours of graduate-level, substantive Sociology coursework or approved courses in other departments
  • Sociology 599: Master’s Thesis (6 hours)[3]

 B. M.A. THESIS PLAN AND PROSPECTUS 

  1. At the end of their first academic year, students should formulate a thesis topic and identify an appropriate TC.

  2. Students must develop a prospectus for their thesis and have it formally approved by their TC. The prospectus should be submitted to the TC within one year of completion of course work. A meeting, preferably with all committee members present, must be held to approve the prospectus. After this meeting, the committee can either formally approve the prospectus, or request revisions. When the TC is satisfied with the condition of the prospectus work, the student will submit a signed copy of the Prospectus Approval form and a copy of the prospectus to the staff Graduate Coordinator. Note all members of the committee must sign this form.

  3. Minor changes in the proposed project are anticipated, and can be made in consultation with the Chair of the student's TC. All members of the TC must approve major changes in the proposed project.  The student and the Chair of the TC are responsible for determining if other committee members would view a change as a major change. In the event that there is a major change, the Chair of the student's TC must prepare a memo describing the change. Signatures from all committee members approving the change must be obtained. The memo, and the accompanying signatures, must be filed with the department staff Graduate Coordinator. 

C. M.A. PROGRAM OF STUDIES

It is the responsibility of every student to file a  Program of Studies  form for the Master’s Degree.  Although this is a transaction between the student and Graduate Studies (see the UNM Catalog and Graduate Studies (website: http://Graduate Studies.unm.edu/), it also requires relevant departmental signatures as indicated on the form itself. The staff Graduate Coordinator can assist in clarifying the rules and regulations for this document and will submit it to Graduate Studies on behalf of the student.  The chair of the student’s TC should also review it prior to submission to ensure that any projected courses and/or the timeline for thesis hours are realistic.

A copy of this form should be filed with the staff Graduate Coordinator prior to its submission to Graduate Studies.

This form is due to Graduate Studies no later than one semester prior to the graduating semester. 

D. M.A. DEFENSE OF THESIS

Students must be enrolled for thesis hours the semester that they graduate. Once a student enrolls for thesis hours, he/she must be continuously enrolled for at least one hour of thesis through the graduating semester.  Only 6 hours of thesis will count toward the degree requirements. 

A Masters student’s final examination is an oral defense of the completed thesis. Students must notify the staff Graduate Coordinator prior to the proposed examination date so that, in consultation, they can complete the Announcement of Examinationform, which must be submitted to Graduate Studies at least two (2) weeks before the exam. Please note signatures are required on this document and therefore students should plan completion of this document in advance of the two-week deadline.

If any member of a TC plans on participating in the defense long-distance (i.e. Skyping or teleconferencing), the student is responsible for notifying the staff Graduate Coordinator so that they can submit a Proxy Signature form to Graduate Studies at least two weeks prior to the defense.  Students are encouraged to seek the staff Graduate Coordinator’s assistance with this process.  

During the defense the student should be able to indicate the relevance of his or her research for the area of sociology that has been the focus of the student's graduate career.

Following the defense students are responsible for the successful submission of all forms on the Graduate Studies Masters Plan Graduation Checklist, available on the Graduate Studies website under ‘Graduate Studies Forms: Graduation.’ In addition, the student is required to submit a final copy of the revised thesis with the department. 

III. CONTINUATION IN THE PH.D. PROGRAM POST-MA

A: POLICY

Continuation in the Ph.D. program is not automaticAll students must formally request to continue on to the Ph.D. program after completing MA requirements.  (The only exceptions are students who hold an M.A. from another institution that has been approved by the Graduate Committee; see above).

B. CRITERIA

The decision by the department to approve continuation in the Ph.D. program will be based on quality of the Thesis, performance in coursework (grades should reflect doctoral-level ability, which means A - or better in the majority of courses), timely progress toward the degree, and other relevant information.

C. PROCESS

Students who wish to continue in the Ph.D. program must submit the “Request to Continue in the PhD Program Post-MA” form prior to their thesis defense.  At the Thesis Defense, thesis committee members will evaluate the student’s request in light of the criteria listed above (see B). Each committee member will submit their recommendation to the Graduate Committee. The Graduate Committee will make the final decision about requests to continue and notify the student accordingly.

IV. Ph.D. REQUIREMENTS

A. COURSE WORK 

All students must obtain a Master's degree en route before pursuing a PhD. The only exceptions are students who hold an M.A. from another institution that has been approved by the Graduate Committee (see above). 

This requires the successful completion of all university and departmental MA degree requirements.

All students are required to take 48 total hours of course work for the Ph.D. plus 18 additional dissertation hours.  The M.A. en route provides the first 30 hours of this coursework (including 6 hours of thesis).  Students who obtained their M.A. at another intuition will take 48 hours of coursework toward the Ph.D.

Required courses for the PhD are[4]:

  • Sociology 523: Theory Proseminar (should be taken first semester)
  • Sociology 500: Classical Social Theory
  • Sociology 513: Contemporary Theory 1 OR Sociology 514: Contemporary Theory
  • Sociology 580: Methods of Social Research I 
  • Sociology 581: Advanced Social Statistics 1 
  • Sociology 582: Advanced Social Statistics 2 
  • Sociology 585: Sociological Fieldwork Methods: Ethnography, Interviews, Focus Groups
  • Twenty-nine hours of graduate-level, substantive Sociology coursework, at least twelve of which
  • Sociology 699: Dissertation (18 hours) 

B. Ph.D. COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATIONS

All PhD candidates must successfully complete comprehensive examinations in two sociological areas. An area is defined as a recognized sub-discipline in sociology. At least one of the two exam areas must be from the following list: Crime, Law, and Social Control; Social Movements; Race and Ethnicity; Sociology of Health and Medicine; Global/Transnational Sociology (usually with an emphasis in Latin America). 

Although the department has faculty resources and course offerings in each of the above areas, the student should note that faculty resources and course offerings are subject to change, and not all areas may be covered at any given time. 

A student may comp in an area outside of the above list if he or she can find two sociology faculty members who agree to serve on the comprehensive exam committee for that area.

Comprehensive exams assess the ability of students to comprehend and evaluate key issues within a particular area of sociology. The exams are viewed as preliminary preparation toward becoming a scholar in a particular area, and toward doing independent research on a dissertation. The exams assess the student's ability to review the empirical and theoretical landmarks of a particular area and the student's ability to analyze, synthesize, and critique major theoretical and empirical materials.

All students will be expected to have a reading list in each area approved by the relevant members of their Comprehensive Exam Committee (CEC), no later than 4 months before the exam. 

1. ESTABLISHING A COMPREHENSIVE EXAM COMMITTEE 

Comprehensive exams require the participation of at least two Sociology Department faculty members in each area. Thus, most examination committees will have at least four members. In some cases it is possible that one faculty member may serve as an evaluator in two areas, leading to an examination committee of three persons. 

The student should consult Appendix B: Faculty Expertise in Comprehensive Examination Areas for guidance in creating their committees. Comprehensive Exam committees are created by the mutual consent of the student and the faculty members the student asks to participate on his or her committee.

While the Graduate Committee supports this practice, it reserves the right to suggest alternate committee members should the makeup of the committee not seem appropriate. Students are strongly advised to be in regular contact with members of their CEC throughout preparation for taking comprehensive exams. 

At least four months before the exam, the student must submit to the staff Graduate Coordinator the Proposal to Take Ph.D. Comprehensive Exams (along with the CEC approved reading list). This document will indicate the faculty members that will be examining the student in each area. The document will also have signatures indicating approval of the student's reading list and preparation in each area. 

2. READING LIST AND COURSE PREPARATION      

The course preparation and reading list for comprehensive exams shall cover the core theoretical perspectives and empirical research in the designated area. Students are encouraged, in addition, to develop comprehensive mastery within a specialized subarea. The comprehensive exam should help prepare a graduate student to: a) teach a graduate course in the area; and b) publish articles in recognized academic journals that deal with the area.

In general, at least two graduate-level courses should be taken in each area of the comprehensive examination. At least one of these courses must be taken in the Sociology department. One of the courses may be an Independent Study course. 

The reading list is created by the student in consultation with all members of the examination committee. All examination committee members must approve the reading list and course preparation for comprehensive examinations at least four months prior to the exam. The document Proposal to Take Comprehensive Exams records the above requirements. 

All reading lists for comprehensive examinations will be filed with the staff Graduate Coordinator and be available for public review. Additionally, once the exam has been completed the exam questions will be filed with the department staff Graduate Coordinator. 

3. SCHEDULING THE COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION

All PhD coursework must be completed before comprehensive exams can be taken, and the exams should be taken within one year of completion of course work. The student may petition the Graduate Committee for exceptions to this rule, but such petitions will only be approved if the Committee decides that the exception is clearly in the interest of both the student and the department. Students must be enrolled during the semester that they take the comprehensive exam (excluding the summer semester). The oral examination (defense) must be taken within two weeks of completion of the written exams. Students should make clear and explicit arrangements with the Chair of their CEC regarding the precise date of the exams. The Announcement of Examination form is due to Graduate Studies no later than 2 weeks prior to the date of the first exam. Although this form will be submitted by the staff Graduate Coordinator, it is the student’s responsibility to work with the coordinator to ensure that this form is submitted to Graduate Studies at least to weeks prior to the comprehensive exam.

The Chair of the CEC will assist the student in arranging for dates and times of both written and oral exams, and to make sure that relevant paperwork and signatures are obtained, and filed in the proper manner. 

The student must schedule the two parts of the written exam within a two-week period. Students will have eight hours to complete an area exam. The exam must be scheduled on a weekday between 8 am and 5 pm.

The student must use the Department Reading Room computer write the exam, although the internet, books, articles, and notes may NOT be consulted during the exam. Students must complete the exam by 4:45 PM so that staff can close the office by 5 pm. Faculty in each area should meet within two weeks of the second exam to evaluate the performance on the written exam, and communicate their evaluation to the Chair of the CEC. 

4. EVALUATION OF THE COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION 

A. EVALUATION OF WRITTEN EXAM 

Faculty in each area should meet within two weeks of the second exam to evaluate the performance on the written exam, and communicate their evaluation to the Chair of the CEC. The written portion of each area exam will be evaluated independently by each of the appropriate faculty members on the CEC. If two faculty members evaluate an area, then both must agree the student has passed the written exam for the student to proceed to take the oral exam in that area. If more than two faculty evaluate an area, then a majority of the faculty evaluating that area must agree the student has passed the written exam for the student to proceed to take the oral exam in that area. Failure of the written portion of the exam in an area constitutes failure of the exam in that area. 

B. ORAL EXAM AND FINAL EVALUATION OF THE COMPREHENSIVE EXAM 

The oral exam provides the faculty and student with the opportunity to consider aspects of the written exam more closely, as well as related theoretical and methodological concerns in the area of specialization. The oral examination (defense) must be taken within two weeks of completion of the written exams. 

To pass the comprehensive exam in an area, a majority of faculty members evaluating an area must agree to a passing evaluation. If two faculty members evaluate an area, then both must agree to a passing evaluation. In the event a student fails one area, only that area becomes the subject of reexamination. To pass with distinction all members of both areas of the exam committee must agree.

Should a member of the CEC be unable to participate (e.g., for reasons of sabbatical leave), the Department Chair in consultation with other committee members will appoint a substitute. The student to be examined should feel free to consult with the chair and committee members regarding the substitution. 

C. Ph.D. CANDIDACY

It is the responsibility of every PhD student to file an Application for Candidacy form for the Doctoral Degree after passing the comprehensive exams; this form is available on the Graduate Studies website.

Although this is a transaction between the student and Graduate Studies (see the UNM Catalog and Graduate Studies website: http://grad.unm.edu/home/ ), it also requires relevant departmental signatures as indicated on the form itself. The staff Graduate Coordinator can assist in clarifying the rules and regulations for this document and will submit it to Graduate Studies on behalf of the student. 

D. DISSERTATION COMMITTEE

The student nominates a Dissertation Committee (DC) by submitting an Appointment of Dissertation Committee to Graduate Studies. Please read carefully the criteria for your committee members. The staff Graduate Coordinator can assist in clarifying the rules and regulations for this document and will submit it to Graduate Studies on behalf of the student. 

This form needs to be in no later than the first semester of enrollment in Sociology 699. 

The dissertation prospectus form should be submitted within one year of completion of the comprehensive exam. A formal defense of the prospectus is to be made to the candidate's DC. 

E. PROSPECTUS

To achieve formal approval of the dissertation prospectus, the student must hold a meeting with all committee members present, and then file the signed Prospectus Approval Form with the staff Graduate Coordinator. 

F. GRADUATION AND DISSERTATION DEFENSE

Only students appearing on the University’s copy of the departmental graduation list are eligible for graduation each semester[5]. Once each spring, summer, and fall the staff Graduate Coordinator sends out a call for ‘intention to graduate’ in the following semester (i.e. each summer students are asked if they plan to graduate in the fall) and compiles a departmental list that is then submitted to the Graduate Studies office. Eligibility for inclusion on the graduation list consists of a completed and approved Application for Candidacy form, enrollment in 699 Dissertation hours (18 hours need to be completed by the time of graduation) and the reasonable demonstration that the dissertation will be completed by the end of the coming semester.

Students must notify the staff Graduate Coordinator prior to the proposed dissertation defense date so that, in consultation, they can complete the Announcement of Examination form, which must be submitted to Graduate Studies at least two (2) weeks before the defense. Please note signatures are required on this document and therefore students should plan completion of this document in advance of the two-week deadline. The Chair of the DC will assist the student in arranging for dates and times of the defense and to make sure that relevant paperwork and signatures are obtained and filed in the proper manner. 

If any member of a DC plans on participating in the defense long-distance (i.e. Skyping or teleconferencing), the student is responsible for notifying Graduate Studies and submitting a Proxy Signature form at least two weeks prior to the defense. The staff Graduate Coordinator will submit it to Graduate Studies office.

Upon successful completion and revision (if necessary) of the dissertation, the student is required to file a hard copy with the department. The instructions for the mandator Graduate Studies paperwork are available in the

Doctoral (PhD) Graduation Checklist on the Graduate Studies website. Please note PhD students are required to upload a properly formatted copy of their dissertation prior to graduation.

Students must be enrolled in dissertation hours their graduating semester. Once a student enrolls in dissertation hours, he/she must be continuously enrolled in dissertation hours through the graduating semester and accrue a minimum of 18 hours.   

V. TEACHING PREPARATION 

Students wishing to be considered as possible instructors in the department should fulfill the following pedagogical training:

SOC 531: Graduate Teaching Seminar is required of all students before they teach their first course.   Exceptions to this rule may apply to students with substantial teaching experience and/or when the department is unable to offer the course with reasonable frequency.  Other exceptions may be made on a case by case basis.

583.001 Graduate Teaching is an alternative preparation course available. It is a one credit hour course available in the Fall and Spring semester. A separate section is available exclusively for international students. While enrollment is not mandatory, it is looked on very favorably.

The course should be completed with a grade of B or better. Prospective teachers are also required to successfully complete the online FERPA training. The purposes of these training opportunities are to teach graduate students the basics of good pedagogy and contemporary learning theory. Effective teaching is both an art and a science.

VI. STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE AND EVALUATION

Students in the Sociology Department are required to conform to the grade performance standards established in the UNM Catalog. All students should be familiar with these. In particular, students should be aware that all required courses must be passed with a grade of B- or better, or else retaken. 

If a student violates Departmental policy, the student will receive a letter of warning from the Sociology Department Chair. Those continuing to violate the same policy will be subject to disciplinary review.

Each spring semester the faculty will meet in executive session to evaluate the progress of all graduate students. Students who are not progressing adequately will be notified. Failure to show improvement constitutes grounds for removal from the sociology program. A notice of inadequate progress will indicate the amount of time the student has to improve his or her performance. 

 As a matter of academic standards and integrity it is important to elaborate on the rules for participation in convocation and use of degree titles.  Students who have had their dissertation approved by their committee may participate in the graduation convocation. Students are welcome to participate in the next convocation following completion of degree requirements. Students who have not yet had their dissertation approved by their committee may not use the title Ph.D. after their name, as this practice constitutes a misrepresentation of the student's credentials. Students can identify themselves as a Ph.D. candidate on their curriculum vitaeafter the comprehensive examinations and the defense of the dissertation prospectus; however, the signing of letters or any professional correspondence in any way that implies the Ph.D. is completed or is imminent (e.g. “Ph.D. (candidate)”, “ABD (all but dissertation)” among other variations) is prohibited. Students may identify themselves as sociologists once the degree is conferred. 

VII. DEPARTMENTAL FUNDING GUIDELINES

A. Types of Assistantships available from the Sociology Department 

  1. Teaching Assistant (TA): directly responsible for one or more classes or lab sections. Teaching Assistants may not teach courses offered for graduate credit. Tuition hours are included. (PhD students only) Note: depending on availability of GA/TA funds, TAspec may be the only teaching assistantship available during certain semesters. 
  2. Graduate Assistant (GA): one whose duties are related to assisting course instructors but who is not directly involved in teaching. Tuition hours are included.  (MA and PhD students)
  3. Teaching Special (TAspec): an advanced teaching assistant who holds the master's degree (or equivalent) and who is directly responsible for one or more classes. Tuition is NOT included. PhD students who are ABD (all but dissertation) are usually given this type of TAship.  The stipend is higher than that offered in regular TAships so that tuition can be paid. Depending on availability of GA/TA funds, TAspec may be the only teaching assistantship available during certain

B. Criteria for Granting Assistantships

Graduate Assistantships and Teaching Assistantships are awarded and evaluated each semester. Therefore, a GA/TA/TA special should not be assumed to be ongoing, but rather contingent on performance and availability of funding. All students on assistantship are required to complete the online FERPA training.  GA/TA/TA special awards are granted according to the following criteria:

  1. Evidence of adequate progress towards the degree. Students are expected to complete their coursework and requirements in a timely fashion. Although the exact pace varies and each student’s progress will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis, the following guidelines should be kept in mind: two years to complete the M.A., two additional years to complete comprehensive exams, and 2-3 additional years to complete the dissertation.
  2. Academic progress in the program. Academic progress is assessed according to the student’s grades and performance in courses, number and duration of incompletes, thesis, or dissertation, performance on comprehensive exams, and other relevant criteria.
  3. Lingering incompletes are especially dangerous to student progress in the program. They can become a significant obstacle, and can result in a variety of problems with respect to rules on academic standing. To discourage longstanding incompletes, funding requests from students with an “extended” (more than one semester old) incomplete will be given lowest priority while that incomplete is pending. The Graduate Committee can, at its discretion, grant exceptions if warranted by extenuating circumstances. 
  4. Prior performance as a GA/TA/TA special (if relevant).  Performance is assessed according to formal and informal evaluation by the supervising faculty member or instructor, and/or evaluations of teaching (student teaching evaluations, faculty evaluations of teaching), if applicable. GAs are expected to attend the course(s) for which they are grading and make themselves available for office hours or undergraduate tutoring.

C. GA/TA reappointments:

By definition, assistantships are term appointments. Students should not assume that they will be reappointed merely because no notification or termination at the end of the appointment period has been received. Reappointment is contingent upon the continuing availability of funds and the student’s academic and assistantship performance.

D. Termination Before End of Appointment Period

The graduate unit will notify students of termination, and a copy of this notification forwarded to the Dean  of Graduate Studies. In the case of students who are placed on academic probation, Graduate Studies will terminate the contract and notify the appropriate graduate unit. The stipend for assignments that are terminated before the end of the appointed period, either by voluntary resignation or dismissal will be prorated for the period during which the assistant was employed.

E. Medical Leave

Assistantship recipients who suffer a serious medical condition requiring absence from assigned duties for two consecutive weeks may be granted, upon written request to the head of the graduate unit, a two-week sick leave without loss of stipend. After this leave, the student will be paid only for the time the assistantship responsibilities were fulfilled. The graduate unit must notify the Graduate Studies whenever it grants an assistant a two-week sick leave, as well as the date that the assistant returns to his/her position.

VIII. COURSE TRANSFER POLICY

Under exceptional circumstances graduate students may be granted a substitution for a required class. Graduate students may make this request by sending a memo to the graduate committee. The memo should include a detailed comparison of the syllabi for the courses. The student’s transcript (only grades of B+ or better will be considered) and copies of the syllabi should also be included.

IX. FACULTY EXPERTISE AND CORE COURSES IN COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION AREAS

Students are only required to take one CORE course in a given area; the secondary course requirement can be completed via one of four ways: (1) another core course listed for the area; (2) a class from the secondary course list of the area; (3) SOC 551- an independent study with one of the listed professors in the area; or (4) a relevant graduate course in another UNM department. Those selecting option (4) must present a syllabus and earn a grade of B- or better. Please note that course offerings and names may change; those listed below note some of the more recent offerings in each area.

CRIME, LAW, AND SOCIAL CONTROL

FACULTY: Christopher Lyons, María Vélez, Noah Painter-Davis, Aubrey Jackson, Brian Soller, Daniel Ragan, Lisa Broidy

CORE COURSES: SOC 507 Theories of Crime, SOC 507 Research on Crime and Delinquency

SECONDARY COURSES: SOC 595 Contemporary Issues in Criminology, SOC 595 Communities, Race and Crime, SOC 595 Politics of Crime and Punishment

SOCIOLOGY OF HEALTH AND MEDICINE

FACULTY: Kristin Barker, Owen Whooley, Kimberly Huyser, Jessica Goodkind, Brian Soller, Daniel Ragan

CORE COURSES: SOC 540 Medical Sociology and Health Policy, SOC 595 Sociology of Medical Practice 

SOCIAL MOVEMENTS

FACULTY: Sharon Erickson Nepstad, Richard Wood, Wayne Santoro, Felipe Gonzales, Owen Whooley

CORE COURSE: SOC 510 Social and Political Movements; SOC 507: Political Culture

RACE AND ETHNICITY

FACULTY: Jessica Goodkind, Nancy López, María B. Vélez, Roberto Ibarra, Felipe Gonzales, Kimberly Huyser, Noah Painter-Davis, Wayne Santoro, Reuben Thomas

CORE COURSE: SOC 520 Racial and Ethnic Relations

SECONDARY: SOC 528 Sociology of Mexican Americans, SOC 507 Race & Education, SOC 507 Race & Gender and SOC 595 Communities, Race & Crime 

GLOBAL/TRANSNATIONAL[6]

FACULTY: Sharon Erickson Nepstad, Richard Wood, Harold Toro-Tulla

CORE COURSES SOC 506 Comparing Nations/Political Economy of Global Inequality, SOC 507 Gender and International Development;SOC 511: Globalization, Human Rights and Social Change; SOC 512: International Political Sociology 

Additional Areas:

The department also offers expertise in the following areas, though the course offerings are provided as demand allows.

EDUCATION 

FACULTY: Nancy López, Harold Toro-Tulla

CORE COURSE SOC 521 Sociology of Education 

SECONDARY SOC 507 Race & Education, SOC 507 Equity and Division in Higher Education and SOC 507 Latinos & Higher Education

RELIGION

FACULTY: Richard Wood, Sharon Nepstad 

COURE COURSE: SOC 532 Sociology of Religion SOC 507 Sociology of Culture 

GENDER

FACULTY: Kristin Barker, Nancy López, Aubrey Jackson, Jessica Goodkind

CORE COURSE: SOC 595 The Sex/Gender System 

SECONDARY COURSES: SOC 507 Gender and International Development SOC 507, Race & Gender, SOC 595 Gender and Crime 

ORGANIZATIONS

FACULTY: Reuben Thomas

CORE COURSES: SOC 530 Sociology of Work, SOC 505 Complex Organization 

POLITICAL

FACULTY: Felipe Gonzales, Richard Wood, Wayne Santoro, Aubrey Jackson, Harold Toro-Tulla, Reuben Thomas, Sharon Erickson Nepstad

CORE COURSE: SOC 510 Social and Political Movements, SOC 507: Political Culture; SOC 512: International Political Sociology 

OTHER AREAS REPRESENTED:

Kristin Barker: sociology of knowledge

Jessica Goodkind: community-based participatory research

Noah Painter-Davis: demography

Daniel Ragan: quantitative methods, networks

Brian Soller: quantitative methods, networks

Harold Toro-Tulla: stratification, economic sociology

Reuben Thomas: quantitative methods, networks

Owen Whooley: sociology of knowledge


[1] Exceptions can be made under extraordinary circumstances with the consent of the TC and the department chair’s approval.

[2] Required courses are generally closed to non‐degree students. The professor teaching the course will have discretion over enrollment decisions, prerequisites, etc.

[3] Once a student begins thesis hours he or she must continue enrolling each semester until graduation. This does not include summer semesters if no other course enrollment is occurring. Note this may result in more than 6 hours of Sociology 599 earned, although only 6 hours will count toward the degree requirements.

[4] Required courses are generally closed to non‐degree students. The professor teaching the course will have discretion over enrollment decisions, prerequisites, etc.

[5] Exceptions can be made under extraordinary circumstances with the consent of the DC and the department chair’s approval.

[6] Usually with Latin American focus